Stricken yacht abandoned, crew rescued

The yacht was found between Whale Island and Double Island. Photos: Whitianga Volunteer Coastguard Facebook.

Crew members of a stricken yacht were forced to abandon the vessel near Whitianga over the weekend.

The yacht, which had four people on board, lost the use its sails and aux engine and was drifting towards Double Island, off the coast of Colville, on Saturday.

In a post on Facebook, a spokesperson for the Whitianga Volunteer Coastguard says the rescue kicked-off what was a “frantic 12 hours for the duty crew”.

The crew received a call at 11pm on Saturday for assistance from a stricken yacht in the stretch of water between Whale Island and Double Island.

“The yacht with 4 POB had lost the use of its sails and aux engine and was drifting towards Double Island.

“The combination of no moon, 2M south to SE swells mixed with a half meter wind chop made for a very interesting and slow trip out for the responding Coastguard Rescue vessel,” reads the post.

The vessel’s crew were suffering the effect of their ordeal and the conditions were such that the vessel could not be safely taken under tow.

“The decision was taken to take the crew on board the CRV and to abandon the vessel which was now anchored.

“The crew were transported back to Whitianga without incident and apart from shock and sea sickness, no worse for wear.

“The CRV Crew got to bed at 3am and were back in the shed at 8am Sunday for a trip out to try and recover the yacht.

“Unfortunately, once again the attempt was foiled by the weather conditions.”

Another attempt is expected to be made during a forecasted break in the weather this afternoon.

“Many thanks to Steve Kingsbury, the Skipper of the CRV, who provided accommodation for the yachts crew overnight.”

 

 




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1 Comment

Great Effort

Posted on 28-03-2022 07:39 | By Yadick

What a great effort by everyone involved resulting in an awesome rescue with no lives lost and no families torn apart. Well done to all involved from on the sea to land based communications, accommodation and meals and everyone in-between.

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