A city in transformation

An artist's impression of what the heart of Tauranga city could potentially look like. Image: TCC

Tauranga is on a journey of transformation says City Transformation Committee Chair Larry Baldock.

Today the Council’s City Transformation Committee met for the first time this year, and set out their priorities for the year ahead; to continue with investment and development that will achieve a higher standard of living for all.

“We have some real momentum in our city now, you can see the change happening all around us,” says Larry Baldock, City Transformation Committee Chair.

“Our role is to enable this growth and ensure it is well planned to support successful urban centres and a vibrant city centre that is the cultural, educational and civic heart of the city."

In the meeting today, the committee set out their priorities for Tauranga:

  •   •  Well managed growth to create a sense of place and unique identity for the city centre and urban centres.

  •   •  Careful urban form planning, to influence the physical layout and structure of the city to enhance lifestyle, amenity and liveability.

  •   •  Working in partnership to advance the development of a vibrant, safe and successful central city through new education, community and cultural facilities.

  •   •  Attract city centre investment including retail, commercial office development and residential living.

  •   •  Enable better housing choices for residents through options of density, diversity, housing affordability and mixed-use (commercial and residential).

  •   •  Upgrade of streets and open space to build character, with neighborhoods that are better connected and support cycling and walking.

The City Transformation Committee has seen a number of major milestones over the past year, with developments in the central city including the opening of the popular city centre waterfront, tidal stairs and pier.

Council has been working closely with the community to understand their aspirations for Tauranga, this has resulted in a number of initiatives progressed including a Tauranga museum and new central library proposal to be included in the draft Long Term Plan 2018-2028.

A spatial framework has also been created to guide the look and feel of streetscape design in Tauranga’s city centre as it grows, with the Durham Street upgrade beginning in April 2018.

New developments including Te Tumu and Tauriko West are moving forward and expected to collectively provide homes for more than 20,000 people.

Engagement has also kicked off on the draft Tauranga Urban Strategy, which will be a significant driver for urban centre place making, creating a greater range of housing options for residents.

“It is an exciting time for Tauranga and we are proud to be part of this committee which represents the community, guiding our growth for the years to come,” says Larry.

Have your say on the growth of our city and share your thoughts in our survey – visit www.tauranga.govt.nz/urban-strategy.


3 Comments

All pretty

Posted on 10-02-2018 18:49 | By MISS ADVENTURE

But no one is at home, the CBD is empty, Red Square is compeltely vacant, the more they "think" the more they spend the less people go there, attend or even want or can be there. When will these money gouging officicals and muppets realise that they are doing more harm than good?

does it really matter

Posted on 09-02-2018 06:40 | By Mein Fuhrer

how trendy and fashionable our little CBD looks, as most of the people will be heads down swiping their precious wifi devices.

Another Lowry painting

Posted on 08-02-2018 11:12 | By maildrop

Sure, the consultants, architects, building companies and artist impressionists (lol) will have a higher standard of living because they are printing their own money and the printing machine is smoking thanks to this visionary Council. My standard of living is going down because I feed the the printing machine.

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