Dive footage of Rena

Video records of recent dive surveys of the wreck of the Rena show the size of the task still awaiting salvors.

A recent dive on the cargo hold in the ship's sunken stern section shows smashed containers, cargo and the fish that now inhabit the wreck.

The videos are made available by the insurers The Swedish Club, and can also be seen on the Rena project website, here.

Claims manager Captain John Owen says the action of the sea has layered the contents of the hold.

“There's all kinds of wreckage down there, pieces of container, and bits of what was in containers,” says John.

“Every now and again you see something shiny, when you see the shiny things, they are aluminium ingots.”

The small pieces have dropped to the bottom leaving the large pieces of wreckage on top.

“We are going to have to lift off the big pieces using a crane or lift bags. That will give us access to the smaller pieces and the ingots and pieces of container that are still on the site.

“Anything not steel or not heavy in my opinion it's all been washed away. It's superbly clean and there are masses of fish.”

The second video is of the dive survey undertaken last October/November that the salvors Resolve undertook on behalf of the owners.

It is part of a traverse of the hull sitting on the bottom. The video starts at the very aft section of the ship at a depth of about 65 metres.



5 Comments

@ Dollie

Posted on 25-01-2013 15:46 | By The Big Tomatosaurus

Are you saying the reef is not important to non-Maori? Why should Maori get a special reef tour and no other race? So iwi have special expertise that can determine the health of a reef from a dive.....and none of us can!!! I am in awe of these all powerful magical Iwi that are in touch with all animals and fish and birds (well, not the Moa anymore) and even reefs!

Health of the Reef

Posted on 25-01-2013 15:25 | By Dollie

The reef is an important fishing ground to local tangata whenua from Motiti and others close by. The reason for the dive is to look at the the health of the reef. You can't do that from a boat looking down. Apparently Iwi have expertise that can do this. It's not the wreck that's important, it is the reef to Maori.

more racism against non-maori

Posted on 25-01-2013 07:37 | By Captain Sensible

The newspaper reported that maori wanted a "cultural impact assessment" of the reef, including a dive. I agree with Patsyanne - maori never dived on this reef. Food was so abundant, there was no need to anyway. Iwi are just mafia on the lookout for something free where they can make a big fuss and pretend they are fish whisperers !! So what date is the inspection for the non-maori??

@Dollie

Posted on 24-01-2013 22:19 | By

Why Iwi? what makes iwi more important than divers generally? This is not a traditional maori diving reef, since traditionally maori did not have scuba. that is a recent invention. get off your racist high horse. All divers have equal rights here, not just your racially selected iwi.

PR Exercise to allay Iwi concerns

Posted on 24-01-2013 19:24 | By Dollie

Why has this video footage been released so soon after Iwi have wanted to dive there? Iwi were wanting to dive to ascertain the condition of the Reef. It's interesting to see that there is no footage of the reef, mainly because these divers are employed for the wreck only.

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