Sorry, your browser is too old to view this website.

Click Here To See How To Update or

Visit our basic site

Sunday, October 26, 2014

SunLive - The Bay's news first
LATEST
TRENDING

OPINION POLL

After a spate of recent gun crimes, do you think NZ police officers should be armed at all times?

Yes
No
VOTE
RESULTS

Home >> Local News >> Local News

Sea snake spotted in harbour

Posted at 9:46am Wednesday 04 Jan, 2012 | By Letitia Atkinson

A poisonous yellow-bellied sea snake related to the cobra has been spotted in the waters of Tauranga Harbour.

Omokoroa resident Shane Davies was out fishing in the harbour on Tuesday evening when he spotted the snake near the Plummers' Point boat jetty.


A poisonous yellow-bellied sea snake has been spotted in Tauranga Harbour.

“Me and my son were fishing there all night and one came wriggling around by the jetty there.

“We told a few people but no one really believed us, it was all yellow and wriggling across the top of the water, like a snake would on sand.”

NIWA – the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research is warning people to beware of the snake while swimming this summer.

Principal scientist Malcolm Francis says while the snake usually preys on fish, bites to humans can cause paralysis or renal damage if the snake's venom it finds its way into the human body.

Shane says the difference between sea snakes and eels is that sea snakes travel on the surface of water and complete the ‘S' wriggle.

“That was right in the harbour, right close to the boat ramp. It was about one metre long, so not small, and it wasn't scared of us.

“We went down and were poking a stick at it and it wriggled towards us, so we had to jump back because the tide was coming over the jetty.”

The yellow-bellied sea snake is related to the Cobra and has been sighted as far south as the Cook Strait, but is most common in the northeast part of the North Island.

Malcolm says the snake lives in the open sea and travels with ocean currents.

“They live near the surface, hang around with logs and drifting seaweed, and feed on the fish that aggregate in those areas.”

Swimmers are urged to keep their distance if they spot the yellow bellied snake.


COMMENTS


Posted on 04-01-2012 12:13 | By whatsinaname

“That was right in the harbour, right close to the boat ramp. It was about one metre long, so not small, and it wasn't scared of us. “We went down and were poking a stick at it and it wriggled towards us, so we had to jump back because the tide was coming over the jetty.” What a stupid thing to do.agrivate n a dangerous poisonous snake. asking for troublle. i suppose the Rena will be blamed for it coming into the harbour.......

Snake

Posted on 04-01-2012 10:45 | By Katzeye

First of all YIKES!!! Not something I want to be swimming with... And second... What is 'finishing'? You should really proof read a little better before posting an article.

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to make a comment.

BAY TODAY


Bamboo in the Hamilton Gardens. Photo by Chloe Phillips. Send us your photos and stories from around the Bay of Plenty.
photos@thesun.co.nz